The New York Optimist
October 2008
Greetings:
Artists including
Andy Warhol, Stacy Boge, John Waters and Jeremy Kost used the format to take acute renderings of time and place. It was a wonder of
its time: A camera that spat out photos that developed themselves in a few minutes as you watched. You got to see them where and when you took them, not a
week later when the prints came back from the drugstore. But in a day when nearly every cellphone has a digital camera in it, “instant” photography long ago
stopped being instant enough for most people. Last month, the inevitable end of an era came: Polaroid is getting out of the Polaroid business. A few artists had
clung to the medium for their work. They are mourning the end of the Polaroid era, saying that for some applications, nothing compares to the look they could
get from this film. But does it mean the death knell for art and instant photographers? Thanks to a new generation of artists, Polaroid will never be forgotten.

With photographs that look like a memory, textured, weathered and whimsical, you don't have to live an image to love it. To take a picture is to hit pause on a
moment forever. That's the inspiration behind she hit pause studios nostalgic, winsome images of surfing, Coney Island, our city and all the pretty ladies who
live here. Sharpshooter Matt Schwartz uses Polaroid transfers to capture private moments or pretty objects in unexpected places. Think discarded typewriters,
toy pianos in fields, and modern pinup girls printed on watercolor paper and framed with antique barn wood. A new generation photographer who uses old
world techniques to create arresting images that won’t break the bank.

COST-EFFECTIVE PHOTOGRAPHY
Many would-be buyers choke when it comes to filling a blank wall. End your art anxiety.  Accessibly priced Top-caliber modern fine art photography is now
available to satisfy serious art admirers via internet without the confines of a traditional gallery. Shehitpausestudios.com invites first-timers to own a piece of
contemporary, exclusive photography created in a small series. Satiate the art lover within through this unrivalled gallery. Sure to delight enthusiasts and serious
collectors alike


Unframed images come in a 16x20 matte.
8x10 image Limited-Edition prints $65.00
11x14 image Limited-Edition prints $85.00

The sizes for framed images are as follows:
All images are available framed using the photographer's signature style weathered barn wood.
8x10 image (with matte) comes in an 11x14 barn wood frame Limited-Edition prints $150.00
11x14 image (with matte) comes in a 16x20 barn wood frame Limited-Edition prints $185.00
WORKHOUSE
PUBLICITY
THE END OF POLAROID?

DON’T BET ON IT! NEW GENERATION OF ARTISTS UPHOLD THE MEDIUM


SHE HIT PAUSE STUDIOS

BY SHARPSHOOTER MATT SCHWARTZ

PHOTOGRAPHS THAT LOOK LIKE A MEMORY; TEXTURED, WEATHERED & WHIMSICAL



NOW SCHEDULING EDITORIAL APPOINTMENTS WITH SHE HIT PAUSE STUDIOS
PHOTOGRAPHER MATT SCHWARTZ PLEASE CONTACT WORKHOUSE  PUBLICITY
CEO, ADAM NELSON AT 212.645.8006   
 
USA- 60 years have passed since Edwin Land started something that changed the world of photography- the first Polaroid instant camera. Since that day,
thousands of kids, adults, photographers, artists and wannabe's have seen the world through the eye of an instant lens. But every once in a while we say
goodbye to a technology that has been replaced by a demonstrably superior successor, yet we still hold onto a bit of nostalgia for the old way. After half of a
century the
Polaroid Corporation is exiting the film business and closing plants in Massachusetts. No more instant cameras, no more instant film. But does it
mean the death knell for art and instant photographers? Thanks to a new generation of artists, Polaroid will never be forgotten.

With photographs that look like a memory, textured, weathered and whimsical, you don't have to live an image to love it. To take a picture
is to hit pause on a
moment forever. That's the inspiration behind she hit pause studios nostalgic, winsome images of surfing, Coney Island, our city and all the pretty ladies who
live here. Sharpshooter
Matt Schwartz uses Polaroid transfers to capture private moments or pretty objects in unexpected places. Think discarded typewriters,
toy pianos in fields, and modern pinup girls printed on watercolor paper and framed with antique barn wood. Captured images are ultimately filled with softness,
sensuality, poetry and retro timelessness. Shooting in large format polaroid, the image is pulled apart and the film negative is rubbed onto watercolor paper to
create a transfer. The result is an arresting image that appears to be a synthesis of an old photograph and a painting combined. The images are sold in limited
edition-quantities framed in his signature barn wood frames. Brooklyn-based She hit pause studios devotees include Anthropolgie who purchased 250 images to
populate 95 of their stores,
Maidenform, Martha Stewart, Daily Candy, and more. For more information visit www.shehitpausestudios.com

Digital photography is an efficient, truly instantaneous modern standard, but there was something magical about a Polaroid picture. Polaroid had its own
mystique. A few artists had clung to the medium for their work. They are mourning the end of the Polaroid era, saying that for some applications, nothing
compares to the look they could get from this film. These artists are
Andy Warhol, Stacy Boge, John Waters and Jeremy Kost. Andy Warhol was ultimate
master of the use of Polariod capturing timeless images of an era that will never will exist again.

For more information or to schedule an interview with photographer
Matt Schwartz, interested media please contact Workhouse Publicity, CEO Adam Nelson
via email directly by telephone
212. 645. 8006 or via email at nelson@workhousepr.com.

THE POLAROID CORP
Polaroid instant cameras were the invention of Polaroid founder Edward Land. In 1948, the first commercially available model, the Model 95, went on sale at
Boston’s Jordan Marsh Department Store for $89.75. Over the years, as new technology emerged, the cost of the cameras went down, but the company,
thanks to the digital revolution, experienced a slump that eventually led to its bankruptcy and an acquisition by the Petters Group in 2005.The company, which
will concentrate on digital cameras and printers, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2001 and was acquired by a private investment company in 2005.
It started in 1937 making polarized lenses for scientific and military applications, and introduced its first instant camera in 1948.


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Photograpgher: Matt SCHWARTZ